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Stop Saying “I Need To Charge My Phone” And 10 Other Incorrect Expressions

Stop Saying “I Need To Charge My Phone” And 10 Other Incorrect Expressions

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Stop Saying “I Need To Charge My Phone” And 10 Other Incorrect Expressions

As I will always say, there is no total/perfect understanding of the English language. However, improving our vocabulary is a thing we must do to avoid blunders that will lead to embarrassment.


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Compiled here are 12 of some wrong expressions we say unknowingly. Make sure to check reasons provided for each correction made.

12 Wrong Expressions(With corrections)

1. warn (a person) of danger, not about danger.

Don’t say: They were warned about the danger.

Say: They were warned of the danger.

NOTE: But we warn a person against a fault: as, “His teacher warned him against disobeying the regulations.”

2. Write in ink, not with ink.

Don’t say: I have written the letter with ink.

Say: I have written the letter in ink.

NOTE. To “write in ink,” “in pencil,” or “in chalk” means the marks that a pen, a pencil, or a piece of chalk makes. If, however, the instrument is meant by which the writing is done, we use “with” instead

3. Wrong sequence of tenser.

Don’t say: He asked me what I am doing.

Say: He asked me what I was doing.

NOTE. We say: l. He said, “I am waiting for your answer.” 2. He said that London is a great city. 3. He liked you more than he likes me.

4. Using “as usually” instead of “as usual.”

Don’t say: As usually, he left his pen at home.

Say: As usual, he left his pen at home.

NOTE: The English phrase “as usual” is a shortened form of “as is usual.” ‘As usually” is not an English phrase at all. 

5. Using “shall” or “will” instead of “should” or would” in a subordinate clause.

Don’t say: He said that he will come tomorrow.

Say: He said that he would come tomorrow.

“Shall?” and “will” change to “should” and “would” in subordinate clauses, when the verb in the principal clause is in a past tense.

6. Using “one and a half,” etc., instead of “half past one,” etc.

Don’t say: Lessons begin at seven and a half.

Say: Lessons begin at half past seven.

NOTE: In telling time, we say “half past one,” “half past two,” “half past three,” etc. 

7. . Using “according to my opinion” instead of “In my opinion.”

Don’t say: According to my opinion, he is right.

Say: In my opinion, he is right.

NOTE. Avoid also the use of the phrase “as I think” instead of “I think.”

Say: “He is lazy and I think he will fail (not: as I think).” 

8. Using “under the rain” instead of “in the rain.”

Don’t say: They played football under the rain.

Say: They played football in the rain.

NOTE. Also “in the sun” and “in the shade”: as, “He was sitting in the sun (or in the shade).” 

9 Using “at the end” instead of “in the end.”

Don’t say: At the end they reached the city.

Say: In the end they reached the city.

NOTE: “In the end” means (finally or at last). “at the end” means at the farthest point or part: as, “There is an index at the end of this book.” ; “There is a holiday at the end of this month.”

 

9. Using “the reason is because” instead of “the reason is that.”

Don’t say: The reason is because I believe it.

Say: The reason is that I believe it.

NOTE: The word “reason” denotes cause, therefore “the reason is because” is a useless repetition. The correct idiom is “the reason is that . . .” 

10. Using “may” instead of “might” in a subordinate clause.

Don’t say: He told me that he may come today.

Say; He told me that he might come today.

NOTE. The conjunction “that” is never preceded by a comma.

11. Using “a country” instead of “the country.”

Don’t say: I spend my holidays in a country.

Say: I spend my holidays in the country.

NOTE: “A country” is a place like France, India, or Egypt; “the country” is a part of a country consisting of fields, forests, and mountain.

12. Don’t Say: I need to charge my phone.

Say: I need to charge up my phone

Reason: Charge means to place electricity in an electrical device such as a battery:

e.g. She drove the car around the block to charge up its batteries. You charge something up because it’s going to increase the charge available.

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Thanks for reading.

Source: opera.com

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